HARTFORD ANNOUNCES 83 NEW HOUSING VOUCHERS TO KEEP YOUNG ADULTS OUT OF HOMELESSNESS AND KEEP FAMILIES TOGETHER

HARTFORD ANNOUNCES 83 NEW HOUSING VOUCHERS TO KEEP YOUNG ADULTS OUT OF HOMELESSNESS AND KEEP FAMILIES TOGETHER

HARTFORD, CONN (February 15, 2019) – As part of Hartford’s commitment to combat homelessness, today the City of Hartford announced that it has secured eighty-three new housing vouchers worth $743,831 per year through the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) Family Unification Program (FUP).  Hartford applied for these FUP vouchers last year and it won more vouchers than cities like New York, Seattle, and Pittsburgh.  The FUP program is designed to secure housing for families with children who are at risk of being separated primarily due to a lack of housing, but this round of FUP vouchers can be given to young people between 18 – 24 who have left foster care and are homeless or at risk of becoming homeless. 

“Hartford and Connecticut have built powerful partnerships to help reduce homelessness, but far too many young people in our city wake up every day without stable housing, wondering where they will spend the night,” said Mayor Luke Bronin.  “This grant is a really important way to help combat youth homelessness and help young people and families find stable housing. We pursued these new vouchers aggressively because vouchers are one of the most effective ways to reduce homelessness and I’m thankful to the Department of Housing and Urban Development for this very significant grant award.”

“This unprecedented investment of available housing vouchers particularly to our most vulnerable residents gives more Hartford residents access and opportunities to have quality and affordable housing options within the Greater Hartford area,” said City Council President Glendowlyn L.H. Thames.  “Thank you to all of our partners.”

The City of Hartford is also a member of the Greater Hartford Youth Engagement Team Initiative (YETI), a coalition of social service agencies, government agencies, and other stakeholders aiming to make youth homelessness rare, brief, and nonrecurring.

“These new vouchers represent a great opportunity to demonstrate to the rest of the country that with the right investment, coordination, and partnerships, long-term solutions to youth homelessness are possible,” said Matt Morgan, Executive Director of Journey Home, a nonprofit organization that helps to lead the YETI.

Last year, YETI member agencies were awarded $1.5 million through other HUD grants to create a Youth Homelessness Demonstration Program. That program is now working to provide youth specific homeless response resources including youth navigators, diversion and rapid exit funds, crisis housing, rapid re-housing, and provider training and technical assistance.

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